Best Auto Insurance Rates in Georgia

On average, your neighbors pay $70 a month.

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Finding Cheap Car Insurance in Georgia (2020)

Looking for auto insurance in Georgia? We have everything you need to know to get a sweet deal on car insurance in the Peach State. To find the cheapest car insurance for you, it's important to research options in your area.

According to our research, COUNTRY Financial and Georgia Farm Bureau offer the cheapest auto insurance in Georgia. But it's important to recognize that these prices depend on factors specific to the driver, so your rates may vary. We found the cheapest rates for good drivers, young and new drivers, high-risk drivers and drivers with a single accident. We also found the average insurance premiums for the 10 most populous cities in Georgia. Each company weighs these factors ⁠— like age, area and accident history ⁠— differently, so you should shop around to find the cheapest option.

There are plenty of ways to save on car insurance in Georgia, like discounts or bundling policies with the same company. This article covers:

Cheapest car insurance in Georgia

Based on our research, these are some of the cheapest car insurance companies in Georgia:

Cheapest insurance companies Yearly rate
Georgia Farm Bureau $1,318
COUNTRY Financial $1,408
USAA $1,420
Note: Average rates are based on non-binding estimates provided by Quadrant Information Services.1

We analyzed rates from top providers around the state to find what your car insurance rates may look like. According to our research, car insurance costs an average $1,949 annually in Georgia. This base rate is determined from the driving profile from a 35-year-old single male with an average credit score and no accidents on his record. The driver carries a policy with 100/300/50 coverage limits and a $1,000 deductible.

These rates will likely vary because they depend on several factors specific to you, including your age, driving history and ZIP code. For that reason, the most efficient way to find the cheapest auto insurance in Georgia is to compare rates using an online quote comparison tool.

Cheapest car insurance for good drivers

For drivers with a clean driving history and more experience on the road, car insurance is usually cheaper than for a standard driver. According to our research, these three insurance companies offer the cheapest car insurance for good drivers in Georgia:

Cheapest insurance companies Yearly rate
Auto-Owners $1,060
USAA $1,145
Georgia Farm Bureau $1,318
Note: Average rates are based on non-binding estimates provided by Quadrant Information Services.1

On average, a good driver pays an average $134 per month, or $1,612 per year, for car insurance in Georgia.

This graph shows a visual of how much good drivers pay compared to our base driving profile:

Average Car Insurance Premiums for Good Drivers in GA

This data shows that our base driver profile pays around $337 more annually than a good driver. Drivers with no accidents on their record, a good or average credit score and several years of driving experience will likely have cheaper car insurance rates. The best way to reduce your premiums is to drive safely to avoid any accidents or traffic violations. Good drivers typically pay less for insurance because they tend to file fewer claims, which means they cost their insurance companies less money.

Cheapest car insurance for new and young drivers

We found the cheapest insurance companies for new and young drivers in Georgia:

Cheapest insurance companies Yearly rate
Georgia Farm Bureau $2,888
COUNTRY Financial $3,527
Auto-Owners $4,381
Note: Average rates are based on non-binding estimates provided by Quadrant Information Services.1

The data shows that new and young drivers pay $530 a month for car insurance in Georgia. Compared to our base driver profile, who pays $1,949 yearly for auto insurance, new and young drivers pays an average $4,407 more annually. This graph shows how much more rates may be if you're a new and young driver:

Average Car Insurance Premiums for Young Drivers in GA

Young and new drivers generally pay significantly more for car insurance than someone who is older and has more years of driving experience. That's because they're more likely to be in a car accident, which means they're riskier for companies to insure. Of course, even new drivers need car insurance. However, it may be cheaper for a teen or new driver to be added to their parents' policy instead of purchasing their own. Insurers often offer multiple car discounts for families that choose to add drivers to their policy.

If they can't join an existing policy, new and young drivers may want to consider increasing their deductible, searching for discounts (like good student or defensive driving) and comparing insurance quotes.

Cheapest car insurance for high-risk drivers

People who have accidents on their record, have received traffic violations and/or have a bad credit score may be considered high-risk drivers. High-risk drivers tend to pay more for car insurance because they typically file more insurance claims, which costs companies more money. In Georgia, these are the three cheapest insurance companies for high-risk drivers:

Cheapest insurance companies Yearly rate
Georgia Farm Bureau $1,436
Auto-Owners $1,765
Alfa $2,009
Note: Average rates are based on non-binding estimates provided by Quadrant Information Services.1

We found that, on average, a high-risk driver with this profile pays around $3,450 per year for auto insurance. This graph shows how that rate compares to a standard driving profile:

Average Car Insurance Premiums for High-Risk Drivers in GA

Our data shows that a high-risk driver in Georgia pays about $1,501 more yearly, or $125 more monthly, than a driver with a clean driving record. Georgia does not offer any state-mandated auto insurance programs for high-risk drivers. The best way to keep your rates low if you're considered a high-risk driver is to avoid any more traffic violations or accidents. Over time, your driving record should look better to insurers and your rates may lower.

SR-22 requirements in Georgia

If you have a suspended license in Georgia, you may need to file an SR-22. The SR-22 indicates that you maintain the minimum liability insurance required. Georgia state law requires you to keep the SR-22 for three consecutive years. If you cancel the SR-22, your insurer will notify the state government and the suspension will be reinstated.

Georgia is one of three states that also uses an SR-22a form. In Georgia, the SR-22a is known as the Georgia Responsibility Insurance Certificate. It is usually required for repeat offenders of SR-22 laws. You are required to pay an SR-22a in full within six months.

Cheapest car insurance for drivers with one at-fault accident

Even with a single accident on your record, your rates could be higher than if you have a clean record. Here are the cheapest car insurance rates for drivers with one at-fault accident on their driving record:

Cheapest insurance companies Yearly rate
Georgia Farm Bureau $1,436
Auto-Owners $1,765
Alfa $2,009
Note: Average rates are based on non-binding estimates provided by Quadrant Information Services.1

Georgia state-mandated car insurance coverage

In Georgia, drivers are required by law to have minimum liability insurance of 25/50/25. These are the requirements:

Type of coverage Minimum policy requirements
Bodily injury liability $25,000 per person/$50,000 per accident
Property damage liability $25,000 per accident
Uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage Not required if policy holder rejects in writing
Collision and comprehensive coverage Not required

No matter where in Georgia you live, you are required to hold these minimum liability insurance amounts before hitting the road. If you don't, you could face hefty fines and even legal consequences. To find the cheapest liability insurance, compare rates from several companies.

Average Georgia car insurance costs by city

Depending on where you live, you insurance rates may differ. Car insurance companies consider crime rates and accidents in your area to determine how much you pay for coverage. In places with more stolen vehicles, for example, you'll likely have higher premiums. We researched the 10 most populous cities' average insurance premiums. This is what we found:

Average premiums for the 10 most populous cities in Georgia
City Average annual rate
Albany $1,796
Alpharetta $1,993
Atlanta $2,370
Columbus $1,933
Johns Creek $2,094
Marietta $2,130
Roswell $2,034
Sandy Springs $2,079
Savannah $2,043
Warner Robins $1,884
Note: Average rates are based on non-binding estimates provided by Quadrant Information Services.1

Georgia's auto insurance rates are higher than average. Why? One reason is the high rate of accidents. Unfortunately, high car crash rates affect all drivers. Not only can it hike up your premiums, but it can put you at greater risk. In order to protect yourself from the financial woes that come after a crash, we recommend that you buy collision coverage.

Minimum auto insurance covers pretty much what the name says ⁠— the minimum. It's unwise to think it's all you need. Should you have an accident, liability will cover the other driver's damages, but you're on the hook to pay for your own. Even then, it's easy to exceed minimum liability levels. We recommend purchasing more than just the minimum required auto insurance limits.

Car insurance discounts in Georgia

Insurance companies offer a wide array of discounts. Here are some for Georgians:

  • If you are a current or retired military personnel, see if your insurance company has a military discount.
  • If you have more than one car, look into a multi-car discount.
  • If you already have a homeowners or life insurance policy, your insurer probably has a bundle deal for you. Bundling your policies could help you save money on both of them.
  • Students holding down a B average or better probably qualify for a good student discount.
  • If you are 55+ years of age or retired, it can reduce your rates.

Methodology

1These driver profiles were used to conduct research for different categories and gather data from a variety of major insurance companies across several ZIP codes in Georgia:

Good drivers

  • A 35-year-old male driver in Georgia with no accidents on his record, an excellent credit score and 100/300/50 coverage limits with a $1,000 deductible.

Young and new drivers

  • A single, 18-year-old driver with an average credit score and no accidents. The driver has 100/300/50 coverage limits with a $1,000 deductible.

High-risk drivers

  • A single, 35-year-old male with one accident on his record and a poor credit score. He carries 100/300/50 coverage limits with a $1,000 deductible.

Drivers with one at-fault accident

  • A single, 35-year-old woman with an average credit score and one at-fault accident that resulted in $3,000 in property damage. The driver has 100/300/50 coverage limits with a $1,000 deductible.

Cost by Georgia city

  • Rates from all 10 cities are based on our base driving profile. That profile is a 35-year-old single male with an average credit score and no accidents on his record. The driver carries a policy with 100/300/50 coverage limits and a $1,000 deductible.

Georgia Department of Insurance

Website:
https://www.oci.ga.gov/
Insurance Commissioner:
John F. King
Mailing Address:
Two Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive
West Tower, Suite 704
Atlanta, Georgia 30334

Contact consumer services

Phone:
(404) 656-2070
Toll Free:
(800) 656-2298
Email:
Consumer@oci.ga.gov

File an insurance complaint

Website:
Complaint Portal

Sources:

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