Marriage and divorce rates are declining nationwide, indicating that while fewer people are getting married, those who do are staying together.

Our team of analysts found that the marriage rate has declined by 45% since 2009. The divorce rate, meanwhile, has dropped by 21% over the same period.

Key findings:

  • Arkansas, Oklahoma and Nevada have the highest divorce rates.
  • Wyoming, Colorado and Washington have the highest marriage rates.
  • 33% of Americans (1 in 3) have never been married.
  • Men earning over $100,000 a year are the most likely to be married.
  • Women earning $75,000-$100,000 a year have the highest divorce rate.

States with the highest numbers of marriages and divorces

The number of people getting married and divorced in each state is remarkably consistent nationwide. We found that the percentage of people who are married, divorced or never got married, rarely varies by more than 10 percentage points.

  • New York, California and Massachusetts have the highest percentages of people who never married.
  • Idaho, Utah and Wyoming have the highest percentages of people who are married.
  • West Virginia, Maine and Nevada have the highest percentages of people who are divorced.
Marital Status in Each State
State % Never Married % Married % Divorced
Alabama 31% 49% 12%
Alaska 33% 49% 12%
Arizona 34% 48% 12%
Arkansas 29% 50% 12%
California 38% 47% 9%
Colorado 33% 50% 12%
Connecticut 36% 47% 10%
Delaware 35% 47% 11%
Florida 31% 48% 12%
Georgia 35% 47% 11%
Hawaii 34% 50% 9%
Idaho 27% 56% 11%
Illinois 36% 48% 9%
Indiana 32% 49% 12%
Iowa 31% 52% 11%
Kansas 30% 52% 11%
Kentucky 30% 49% 13%
Louisiana 35% 44% 11%
Maine 30% 50% 14%
Maryland 36% 47% 10%
Massachusetts 37% 47% 9%
Michigan 34% 48% 12%
Minnesota 33% 52% 10%
Missiouri 31% 49% 12%
Mississippi 34% 45% 12%
Montana 30% 51% 12%
Nebraska 31% 52% 11%
Nevada 34% 46% 13%
New Hampshire 30% 52% 11%
New Jersey 35% 49% 9%
New Mexico 36% 45% 13%
New York 38% 45% 9%
North Carolina 33% 49% 10%
North Dakota 33% 51% 10%
Ohio 33% 47% 12%
Oklahoma 30% 50% 12%
Oregon 31% 49% 13%
Pennsylvania 34% 48% 10%
Rhode Island 36% 45% 11%
South Carolina 32% 49% 10%
South Dakota 32% 51% 11%
Tennessee 31% 49% 12%
Texas 34% 50% 10%
Utah 31% 55% 9%
Vermont 33% 48% 12%
Virginia 33% 50% 10%
Washington 32% 51% 11%
West Virginia 28% 49% 14%
Wisonsin 33% 50% 11%
Wyoming 27% 55% 12%
United States 33% 49% 11%

American’s marital status may be quite consistent across state lines, but the rate at which relationships are changing is not. There’s also a significant difference between each state's current marriage and divorce rates and what they were in 2009.

marriage and divorce rate change

We found that the marriage rate has dropped by as much as 70% in some states over the last decade. The divorce rate meanwhile, has declined by as much as 60%. Only four states have seen an increase in divorces since 2009.

Marriage and Divorce Rates in Each State
State Marriage Rate Divorce Rate % change in marriage rate since 2009 % change in divorce rate since 2009
Alabama 15 14 -26% -35%
Alaska 18 16 -34% -57%
Arizona 16 12 -37% -31%
Arkansas 17 13 -44% -16%
California 16 9 -49% -27%
Colorado 21 9 -57% -16%
Connecticut 12 11 -33% -34%
Delaware 12 9 -58% 8%
Florida 15 10 -35% -18%
Georgia 17 12 -43% -24%
Hawaii 16 8 -64% -15%
Idaho 19 10 -61% -18%
Illinois 16 8 -51% -23%
Indiana 17 11 -43% -16%
Iowa 16 11 -50% -42%
Kansas 18 10 -51% -10%
Kentucky 17 14 -34% -25%
Louisiana 14 10 -43% -27%
Maine 20 9 -25% -47%
Maryland 16 8 -49% -13%
Massachusetts 15 7 -50% -9%
Michigan 16 9 -40% -20%
Minnesota 18 8 -49% -14%
Missouri 16 13 -28% -30%
Mississippi 18 10 -44% -13%
Montana 16 11 -41% -22%
Nebraska 19 10 -48% -30%
Nevada 18 12 -45% -17%
New Hampshire 15 10 -38% -15%
New Jersey 14 6 -55% 5%
New Mexico 14 10 -49% 1%
New York 14 7 -51% -16%
North Carolina 16 10 -46% -22%
North Dakota 20 8 -70% 4%
Ohio 16 10 -35% -17%
Oklahoma 20 14 -37% -26%
Oregon 16 11 -37% -27%
Pennsylvania 15 7 -48% -18%
Rhode Island 12 10 -37% -31%
South Carolina 15 8 -51% -15%
South Dakota 17 9 -56% -33%
Tennessee 17 12 -32% -27%
Texas 18 12 -42% -28%
Utah 21 11 -60% -13%
Vermont 13 12 -25% -41%
Virginia 18 10 -46% -23%
Washington 21 11 -48% -26%
West Virginia 16 12 -43% -29%
Wisconsin 15 8 -54% -15%
Wyoming 22 11 -63% -7%
United States 17 10 -45% -21%

Marriage and Income

The reasons why marriage and divorce are changing are complex. People are getting married later in life, there’s less of a societal emphasis on marriage and a greater financial cost when getting divorced.

One factor that seems to be fairly consistent is the effect of income on marriage. We found that the more money someone makes, the more likely they are to be married. However, our analysts also found that while women are more likely to be married than men at lower income levels, men are more likely than women to be married at higher income levels.

Overall, men making more than $100,000 a year were the most likely to be married. While women making between $75,000 to $100,000 a year were the most likely to be divorced.

Marriage Rate by Income
Demographic % Never Married % Married % Divorced
Men: $5,000 or less 66% 24% 5%
Men: $5,000 - 15,000 59% 29% 7%
Men: $15,000 - 25,000 53% 35% 8%
Men: $25,000 - 40,000 44% 42% 8%
Men: $40,000 - 75,000 30% 56% 9%
Men: $75,000 - 100,000 21% 67% 9%
Men: $100,000 or more 13% 78% 6%
Women: $5,000 or less 52% 32% 8%
Women: $5,000 - 15,000 47% 36% 9%
Women: $15,000 - 25,000 38% 43% 12%
Women: $25,000 - 40,000 34% 46% 13%
Women: $40,000 - 75,000 26% 55% 13%
Women: $75,000 - 100,000 23% 57% 14%
Women: $100,000 or more 17% 66% 12%

Things to consider for health insurance when getting married or divorced

When getting married, you and your spouse will have the choice to pick a health plan that is available to each of you. For instance, if you both have employer-sponsored health plans, you can choose to select a single plan with the best benefits. The same would apply to a public or private health insurance plan. It will typically make the most sense to each join the same plan, as opposed to having separate plans.

After a divorce, one spouse will likely want to stop being a dependent on the shared health insurance plan. In that case, there are a few options for the spouse leaving the shared plan.

    • Enroll in your workplace plan: A life event like divorce will qualify you to enroll outside of enrollment periods.
    • Continue coverage with your spouse's insurance company with COBRA. A COBRA plan will allow you to keep the same health care coverage in the event that you are no longer with your partner.
    • Get a plan through healthcare.gov.
    • Seek a private insurance plan.
    • Check to see if you qualify for Medicaid or Medicare.

Methodology

Analysts at QuoteWizard reviewed U.S. Census data on marriage and divorce in the United States. Marriage and divorce rates were compared from 2009 to 2019. The percentage of people who are married, divorced or have never been married was derived from 2020 data. Most figures presented here were rounded to the nearest whole number.

QuoteWizard.com LLC has made every effort to ensure that the information on this site is correct, but we cannot guarantee that it is free of inaccuracies, errors, or omissions. All content and services provided on or through this site are provided "as is" and "as available" for use. QuoteWizard.com LLC makes no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, as to the operation of this site or to the information, content, materials, or products included on this site. You expressly agree that your use of this site is at your sole risk.